Social Good Innovations - April 2016

07 Apr 2016|Leslie Pascaud

 old water tap isolated on white3D printed water pipes

In the days following the 2015 Nepal earthquake, water pipes were flown in to help relief efforts, but many were missing key fittings and washers. Instead of putting up with leaks or makeshift solutions to patch them up, onsite 3D printers were used to fill in the gaps. The success was such that NGOs now believe the technology has the potential to reduce the cost of humanitarian aid, and get help more quickly to those in need. Click to read more…

 

Water sources mapped digitally Water sources mapped digitally

Residents of Aleppo in Syria struggle to find safe water sources on a daily basis. The Red Cross created a web app to map the sources across the city, with live updates as the landscape changes due to frequent shelling. Members of the community can also give feedback in case any sources are in need of repair. Red Cross efforts in parallel include working with the local water board to locate neglected water boreholes and refurbish them. Click to read more

 

Delivering a babyDelivering a baby? There’s an app for that

An app has been developed to help health workers in remote areas deal with complicated births. Created by the Maternity Foundation, University of Southern Denmark and the University of Copenhagen, ‘Safe Delivery’ provides lifesaving step-by-step instructions and animated videos. Anna Frellsen, chief executive of the Maternity Foundation says tests of the app in Ethiopia showed that “the ability of health workers to handle postnatal bleeding and resuscitate newborns more than doubled after 12 months of using the app”. Click to read more…

 

Homework goes mobile in LesothoHomework goes mobile in Lesotho

A trial project is underway in Lesotho (southern Africa), to send homework to students via mobile phone. The start-up – Sterio.me – uses basic mobile phones without data plans to operate a ‘text-to-speech’ system where students can answer questions using the key pad.  Teachers can also monitor their progress in real-time. Supported by the by the Vodacom Foundation, the ministry of education and the local teachers’ union, the goal is to roll this out across the country following the trial. Click to read more…

 

 

Insects coming to a cookie near youInsects coming to a cookie near you

Following the report from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization that stated insects are a sustainable food source of the future, edible bugs have slowly been hitting US supermarket shelves. Most recently, organically grown crickets are being used in flour produced by Bitty Foods, a bakery in San Francisco. Crickets are protein rich, and the flour is said to “add an earthy, nutty flavor that gives more depth to the classic cookie”, and they are protein rich. Click to read more…

prev next