Social Good Innovation - September 2015

14 Sep 2015|Added Value

BFG1Panasonic transforms air conditioning drips into drinking water
Panasonic has installed water filters that connect into its air conditioning units to generate drinking water – a move that is said to have increased sales by 20% in Ecuador. Seven liters of water are wasted each day by these units, so this is a great way to transform this excess liquid into drinking water. Panasonic has been gifting the filters out with purchases of the units. 6 months on, 6.3 million liters of clean water have been produced. Click here to read more… 

 

BFG2A ‘novel’ way to filter water
A book has been created to educate readers on water safety, but best of all, the pages can actually be used to filter water. The creators of the book claim that the pages eliminate 99% of bacteria, and one book can provide four years of drinking water for one person. The aim is to send the books to local communities – especially in sub-Saharan Africa where 358 million people don’t have access to clean water. Click here to read more…

 

BFG3Melbourne subway cards help the homeless
Public Transport Victoria is encouraging commuters to donate to the 25000 homeless youth in Melbourne with a simple tap of their subway card on a digital billboard. This quick and innovative donation mechanism proposed by the charity Ladder gives people an opportunity to contribute to a solution in the place where they most often see the problem while ensuring that the money goes directly to the charity. Click here to read more…

 

BFG4Shortening Showers through song
A new Pandora radio channel “Water Lovers Station” has been created by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) to encourage listeners to take shorter showers. The channel features only 5-minute songs and encourages listeners to keep their showers to a single song. The initiative is part of a broader $5.5m water conservation campaign. Click here to read more…

 

 

BFG5A ‘Bee Superhighway’ in Norway
Norwegian nonprofit, Bybi is working to help boost the bee community in Oslo’s city center by encouraging Oslo’s inhabitants to plant bee-friendly flowers every 250 meters along a path through the city to serve as feeding stations for the bees. A Bybi app maps the route for residents, highlighting areas where bee-friendly plants are lacking. Bybi funds the project in part by selling the honey products produced from apiaries across city districts, each with its own flavour and colour. Click here to read more…

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