Impossible is Nothing vs. Anything is possible

23 Jun 2005|Cynthia Chan

Walking down Wangfujing Street, a pedestrian shopping zone in Beijing, I was mesmerized by the range of brands I saw in stores that lined both sides of the street – brands from all over the world. The most interesting and intriguing aspect of this scene was how brands in China are behaving in a more bold and dynamic way than they did in the past.

Walking down Wangfujing Street, a pedestrian shopping zone in Beijing, I was mesmerized by the range of brands I saw in stores that lined both sides of the street – brands from all over the world. The most interesting and intriguing aspect of this scene was how brands in China are behaving in a more bold and dynamic way than they did in the past.

Taglines showcased in the windows of two different stores exemplify this change. One is “Impossible is Nothing” from Adidas. The other is “Anything is Possible” from Li-Ning, a local brand founded by Chinese Olympic gold medalist, Li-Ning. This head-on competition between a global and a local brand is new. But, as more and more local brands emerge as “designed in China” (versus “made in China”), this will go from being an exception to being the norm. That is, unless the global brands get a better understanding of Chinese culture and create a more meaningful connection to China’s 3 billion inhabitants.

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